Dateline : November 16, 2014 Posted by Ligorano/Reese

Voices from the Future

The public addresses what the future looks like. On September 21, 2014 we installed a 3,500 pound ice sculpture of the words The Future at the intersection of Fifth Avenue and 23 Street in New York. This video is a sample of some of the public’s reactions to it.

“When you begin to witness the rapid changes occurring on the planet, rising temperatures, increasing droughts, the extinction of vast numbers of species, you think about loss and disappearance,” Marshall Reese says. “Ice is the perfect material for bringing awareness of what that kind of change means.”

We call the piece ‘Dawn of the Anthropocene’ to describe the effect of humanity on the Earth’s systems. The term comes from Nobel prize scientist Paul Crutzen. In his and other scientists’ view, humanity has entered an age when the power and impact of humans is as great, if not greater, than nature’s.

Sculpture Design – Nora Ligorano; Cinematographer – Ben Wolf; Editor – Marshall Reese; Music – Tree Laboratory; Ice Sculpture – Okamoto Studio

For more information:
Sound design: treelaboratory.com
Climate Action partner: 350.org

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    Dateline : September 24, 2014 Posted by Ligorano/Reese

    Dawn of the Anthropocene Timelapse

    Dawn of the Anthropocene Time Lapse from LigoranoReese on Vimeo.

    Timelapse video of The Future melting at Flatiron North Plaza in New York City on September 21, 2014 during the People’s Climate March.

    “As long as we continue to think of humanity as separate from nature, our solutions will be partial and their effects minimal. Social change drives climate change. We are both separate individual organisms and united by society and ecosystem.” – James Sherry, Social Environment post

    Video – GoPro by Ben Wolf
    Edit – Marshall Reese
    Sound – Gyorgy Ligeti, Poeme Symphonique for 100 Metronomes

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      Dateline : October 2, 2014 Posted by Ligorano/Reese

      The Story Is Here

      This is a collection of Twitter feeds from The Future during the planning and preparation for the launch of the project, including posts from the day of.

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        Dateline : September 24, 2014 Posted by Ligorano/Reese

        Twilight Future Ice Melting Away

        CU11

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          Dateline New York City : Posted by writer in residence

          Niki Singleton

          Niki IMG_1899

          Niki Singleton is a visual artist working in drawing, painting, found material sculpture and installation. These watercolor sketches were created on-site as part of the Dawn of the Anthropocene mini-residency program.
          Continue reading

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            Dateline New York City : Posted by writer in residence

            Watching the Future Melt Away

            Ryan Schlief,  International Accountability Project

            It’s the opposite of watching paint dry.

            Each shiny letter is slowing loosing its weight and form just sitting here. And I am just sitting here watching it slowly come apart. Continue reading

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              Dateline New York City : Posted by writer in residence

              Ha! said the 3AM Guy

              John Weir

              The 3 AM guy is planning my outfit for the giant melting ice sculpture at the Flatiron Bldg., where we’ll be anon. He’s going as a polar ice cap, of course. I want to go as him, which he’s not crazy about.

              Me photographing people photographing melting ice, aka The Future.

              Me photographing people photographing melting ice, aka The Future.

              Continue reading

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                Dateline : September 21, 2014 Posted by writer in residence

                The Survivors

                Joshua Furst

                CU27

                We knew it was coming—everyone knew it was coming—but we hadn’t been ready to admit that it was already here until Long Beach and the Florida Keys and various other barrier reefs along the coast were gone. Well, almost gone: They were gone at high tide but they miraculously reappeared twice a day. We watched this on TV. Continue reading

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                  Dateline New York City : Posted by writer in residence

                  That Ever Elusive Future

                  Chantal Bilodeau

                  IMG_0516

                  I have read dozens of reports and articles about climate change, and heard at least as many scientists talk. I can confidently say that I understand the basic science and that I am aware of the potential consequences of our actions. Yet that understanding hits me most profoundly when I am confronted with a piece of art that helps me not just understand but feel the impact of climate change.

                  I have been watching The Future melt for over two hours now, and every time a piece breaks off, a little piece of my heart breaks off with it. I have grown attached to this melting block of ice and feel, on a very small scale, the sense of loss that perhaps we are not allowing ourselves to feel on a much bigger scale. I am reminded that the future is both beautiful and fragile and that at a moment’s notice, it may fall apart. And I can’t help but think about the Buddhist teaching that says that we only ever have the present moment. The future never arrives. It is always out there, slightly out of reach. But its quality is forever determined by what we make of each moment.

                  By the end of the day, The Future  will be reduced to a puddle of melt water. But hundreds of people will have engaged with it: touched it, photographed it, talked about it, posted or tweeted about it. They may not remember or even know that we recently passed the 400 ppm threshold, or that the Arctic is warming faster than the rest of the world. But they’ll remember the poetry of a melting block of ice. Perhaps they’ll even be touched by it and shape their next present moment in a way that protects that ever elusive future.

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                    Dateline New York City: Posted by writer in residence

                    To Touch The Melting Future

                    (a visitor on Sunday spent quite a bit of time on site, writing and thinking and writing some more. He offered an essay, excerpted here.)

                    On the axis of two traffic arteries, here’s to holding a different territory. As a culture makes some things imperative and others invisible, this is a turning of the knob. Continue reading

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